The 6 worst places to hold your phone during a run (and the two best!)

The 6 worst places to hold your phone during a run (and the two best!)

Ask five different runners the same question and they’ll likely reveal very different methods for keeping their phones safe while running.

“I stick it in my sports bra. I know it won’t fall out!” “I use the zippered pocket in my shorts, but it gets pretty sweaty.” “I just hold it in my hand!”

And then there are purists who don’t believe taking a phone on a run. “I don’t need a phone while I’m running. I just listen to the world around me!”

The truth? There is no one “right” way to be a runner, but there are right and wrong ways to stash your phone during a training run or a race. We’re sure you’ve considered the options and even tried a multitude of solutions, but we thought we’d go through a few of the most common answers to this question that runners try and tackle.

The worst places to put your phone during a run

If you are asking yourself “where do I keep my phone on a run?”, we know that many common options including in your bra, in your waistband or in your hand are less than ideal. So, where is it safe?
  1. In your hand. Keeping your phone in your hand makes it easy to take a selfie during a run, but otherwise it’s just a distraction — and your hand will cramp after a few miles (take our word on this one!). If you take a stumble or a fall, you increase your odds of dropping and damaging it.

  2. In your waistband lining. We’ve all tried the option of tucking it into the waistband of an old pair of sweatpants or running shorts and quickly learned that it won’t stay in place for long at all. Your phone will wiggle its way out and eventually end up in either your underwear (best case scenario) or on the ground.

  3. In your sports bra. We know, we know… a sports bra seems like the perfect place to keep a phone. It’s right there for easy access and you know it won’t pop out and shatter on the ground as you power through the miles. However, breasts are known to get sweaty pretty fast and it’ll eventually get your phone wet. And if it gets too wet? It could ruin your phone.

  4. In your pocket. The pocket of your running shorts was not designed to hold a phone securely in place. Many shorts have minimalist pockets and won’t even hold a phone. If you manage to get your phone in there, as soon as you run it begins to flop against your body, which just doesn’t work for long.

  5. On your arm. Armbands are troublesome for a multitude of reasons. Often thought of as the go-to phone holder option, increasingly runners and gym enthusiasts are switching to other alternatives because of poor design and fit. Armbands bounce and need constant adjustment to keep them secure. Too loose and they slide, too tight and they constrict. You also face the challenge of fitting an armband comfortably over clothing in cooler weather. They can be difficult to access while on the go, requiring awkward one hand maneuvering. And forget about it if you have a newer large size model iPhone or Android, because you’ll need to buy new holder every time you get a new phone and may not even be able to find one that fits the latest models.

  6. In your shoe or sock. Shoes and socks might seem like a good place to stow your phone, but it’ll cause more problems during your run — and you’ll risk it flying out and smashing onto the pavement with every step you take.

The Best Ways to Stash Your Phone on a Run

runner with armband

If you are asking yourself “where do I keep my phone on a run?”, we know that many common options including in your bra, in your waistband or in your hand are less than ideal. So, where is it safe?

  1. A waist belt pack built specifically for storage that holds phone snugly. The FlipBelt ($28.99) is highly rated for this function and was designed to be a low-profile and safe way to store your phone, a small water bottle, keys, credit cards, cash, identification card and small medical devices without added bounce or bulk. The sleek, tubular design also means it won’t rub your body or cause chafing while you’re running.

  2. A large, secure fitting pocket that stays close to your body. The front pocket on the FlipBelt Crops($89) works exactly like the FlipBelt, giving you a place to securely stow your phone while you’re out on a run, along with a smaller pocket in front for your keys. The Crops also feature a zippered pocket in the rear to secure any cash or cards you need to bring with you.
Tip: For an added layer of safety, consider the FlipBelt Reflective Running Belt ($32.99) with ultra-reflective 3M materials that reflect headlights from cars and street lights to help keep you safe when you run at night.

Keeping your phone secure is the best way to avoid expensive repairs.

Listening to your favorite tunes (or an audiobook) on your phone is a great way to pass the time while you run, and we all want a comfortable way to do that. You don’t have to risk dropping it on a run and cracking the screen, or constantly adjusting it. Your phone gives you a lifeline to help if you ever need it while out pounding the pavement, so don’t risk its safety (and yours) by stashing it in a subpar place.

Posted by FlipBelt

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